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 10 Stables You Probably Dont Remember

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boschbourne06
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PostSubject: 10 Stables You Probably Dont Remember    Tue Aug 30, 2016 11:41 am

found this online thought was pretty good trip down memory lane.

Quote :
10: X Factor - Not only did X-Factor have one of the most appallingly bad entrance themes in WWE history (seriously, look it up) but they’ll surely go down as one of the most lifeless groups in WWE history. They formed shortly after Justin Credible’s 2001 debut, when the former ECW Champion saved X-Pac from an attack by Chris Jericho. Credible and X-Pac formed a tag team, and recruited Albert as the group’s burly enforcer a few weeks later.

The group sounds relatively inoffensive on-paper, but the only thing they were ever good at was sucking the life out of a live audience. “X-Pac heat” was reaching its zenith at this point, and fans were openly chanting “X-Pac sucks” even on shows that the man himself wasn’t making an appearance. X-Pac’s popularity problem paired with Credible & Albert’s complete lack of dynamism and overness resulted in one of the most unthreatening stables that the company has ever produced.

Fortunately, X-Factor died a quick, merciful death during the Invasion angle. Credible joined The Alliance to represent ECW, while X-Pac and Albert stayed loyal to the WWE side. This was less than five months after the group’s formation, and it effectively spelled the end of their alliance. Their TV time was limited, lacklustre, and lifeless, and is only remembered as a footnote in each man’s WWE career.

9: Men On A Mission - Mable, Mo, and their manager Oscar were three monstrous large competitors who initially entered WWE as a bloodthirsty heel unit, before being repackaged as “Men on a Mission.” They wore garishly bright clothes with their big smiles, and as Oscar rapped them to their ring, they had only one goal in mind: to spread positive vibes.

It was every bit as cheesy and gag-inducing as it sounds.

Men on a Mission were supposed to be super-babyfaces who’d make the fans adore them by inspiring positive change in urban neighbourhoods. They were promoted through a series of kitschy vignettes that saw them walking down various streets in impoverished ghettos, preaching the power of positivity several decades before The New Day’s inception.

Despite their inherent corniness, Men on a Mission were a moderate success with the crowd thanks to their fun-loving personalities and Mabel’s outrageous size. Mabel and Mo eventually turned heel by attacking the Smoking Gunns and Oscar in 1995, and continued as a two-man unit thereafter. Mabel became King of the Ring in 1995, but both were released less than a year later after fracturing The Undertaker’s eye socket and almost breaking Diesel’s back in separate matches.

Mabel would later return to WWE a couple of times as Viscera, but the “World’s Largest Love Machine” is best left in the past.

8: D.O.A - WWE were highly-focused on stable warfare in 1997, and the Disciples of the Apocalypse were thrown together as a redneck biker gang without much on-screen presence. Consisting of Crush, Chainz, and Skull & 8-Ball, they were a hastily-compiled group that engaged in matches with the likes of Los Boricuas and The Nation of Domination, but they were never able to separate themselves from the pack.

The stable came about in June ‘97. Crush had been thrown out of the Nation, and decided, for whatever reason, to put his own set of Hells Angels together. The three-way feud with the Nation and Boricuas was aimed at putting all three factions on the map, but only the Nation maintained any kind of relevancy throughout it, and D.O.A were always seen as the third wheel.

Crush left the company in protest of the Montreal Screwjob in late 1997, and Chainz assumed leadership. D.O.A started teaming with Ahmed Johnson and Ken Shamrock to battle the Nation shortly after, and engaged in a particularly unremarkable feud with another disastrous WWE stable: the Truth Commission.

The stable became a tag team when Chainz left in 1998, and Sull & 8-Ball inherited the D.O.A name as a tag team. A feud with the Legion of Doom followed, but the new D.O.A died out shortly afterwards both both men made the jump to WCW.

7: The New Brood - Everyone knows The Brood. Gangrel, Christian, and Edge’s vampire gimmick would never work in today’s WWE, but it was a perfect fit during the Attitude Era, and while The Brood were never a main event threat, they remain one of the period’s most memorable stables. Oh yeah, they also had one of the most memorable ring entrances in WWE history, which certainly doesn’t do them any harm.

Few ever mention “The New Brood,” however. The original group disbanded as Edge & Christian’s tag team career started taking flight, and Gangrel turned on Edge during an episode of Sunday Night Heat. Gangrel tried to convince Christian to follow him, but Christian was too committed to his tag partner, and Gangrel looked elsewhere: The Hardy Boyz.

Their blink-and-you’ll-miss-it assocation started and ended during a series of matches against Edge and Christian. Dubbed the “Terri Invitational Tournament,” the Hardyz’ victory saw them win Terri Runnels’ managerial services, and they called a truce with E&C shortly after winning. This led to the four of them attacking Gangrel, effectively ending the new partnership, and leaving WWE’s one true vampire all on his lonesome, poor guy...


6: The NWA - The National Wrestling Alliance dates back to the 1940s, and is the longest-running professional wrestling organisation in the world. Any wrestling historian knows and understands the NWA’s historical significance, but they were in a shambles by the 1990s. WWE, WCW, and ECW broke away from the territorial system and struck-out on their own, reaching great new heights in the process, but effectively devastating the NWA.

The Alliance was in ruins by 1997, but they struck a deal with WWE to increase their visibility and try to re-establish themselves on a national scale. The arrangement saw the NWA’s champions regularly appear on Raw in a move that’d boost the NWA’s exposure, and give WWE some much-needed depth across the roster that was practically hemorrhaging talent to WCW.

Things didn’t quite work-out, however, and WWE’s NWA faction was a rank failure, and the progressively laconic Barry Windham and badly ageing Rock & Roll Express failed to click with WWE’s audiences. Not even legendary mouthpiece Jim Cornette could get the unit over, and the NWA stable’s end came shortly after the New Midnight Express (“Bombastic Bob” Holly and “Bodacious Bart” Gunn… yes, really) lost to the New Age Outlaws at King of the Ring ‘98.

The NWA invasion failed on every every conceivable level, despite involving talented guys like Cornette and NWA Champion Dan Severn.

5: Los Boricuas - It’d be wrong to mention the Disciples of the Apocalypse without acknowledging Savio Vega's own ragtag bunch of rogues. Kicked-out of the Nation of Domination at the same time as Crush, Vega formed Los Boricuas with Miguel Perez, Jose Estrada Jr. and Jesus Castillo in June 1997. They came with some pedigree at least: Perez’s father was one half of WWE’s first recognised tag team champions, while Estrada’s father was a former WWF Junior Heavyweight Champion.

Sadly, Los Boriucas were another bust. Savio Vega and his gang of Puerto Ricans were WWE’s questionably racist Hispanic equivalent to the African-American Nation and the D.O.A’s Hells Angel stylings, and only Vega himself brought any real name value to the table. They worked regularly against the aforementioned stables but struggled to accomplish much together, and everyone but Savio Vega left the company in 1999.

The stable was later revived in Puerto Rico’s IWA in 2001, and they have since appeared together for a host of promotions across the island. Their 1997 feud with D.O.A won the Wrestling Observer Newsletter’s coveted “Worst Feud of the Year” award, and while “gang warfare” sounded like a decent concept, it failed miserably. The writers couldn’t make any of Los Boriucas feel relevant or important, and if you’ve more chance of meeting a unicorn in a McDonald’s than finding a WWE fan who can name all four members off the top of their head.

4: The Un-Americans -Canada vs. America has been one of wrestling’s most leaned-on storylines over the years. Every major North American promotion has ran the angle to varying degrees of success, with Bret Hart leading the charge in WWE, Lance Storm in WCW, and, ahem, Scott D’Amore in TNA.

The quality of these stories has frequently veered between “great” and “terrible” (usually the latter), and The Un-Americans are rarely ever mentioned. Formed in June 2002, Lance Storm took to claiming that WWE had been discriminating against Canadian wrestlers for years, and soon recruited has tag team partner Christian and Test to his cause.

Each member suffered a loss due to refereeing incompetence in the lead-up to their formation, hence the “discrimination” angle, and they regularly carried upside down American flags to the ring. The Un-Americans made several attempts to publicly burn the American flag throughout August and September, but were always stopped and beaten-up by wrestlers like Bradshaw and Kane.

Time saw the stable bolster their ranks with William Regal, but the four-man group didn’t last long. They split into two groups of two after a series of tag losses, and while Regal and Storm’s anti-American sentiments remained intact, Christian and Test’s soon faded away.

3: Mean Street Posse - The Mean Street Posse were one of the Attitude Era’s most notable enhancement talent groups. Running the gimmick of entitled upper-class rich guys, they came to the ring in sweater vests and dress pants, and were legitimate high-school friends of Shane McMahon. Pete Gas and Rodney were the group’s goons while Joey Abs was brought-in as their token “worker,” though they rarely looked anything less than useless.

They debuted alongside McMahon, and would regularly interfere to help him retain his European Championship in 1999. The group originally featured two other members named Billy P and Willie Green, but both were quickly pulled from the group without any explanation, and their identities remain a mystery to this day.

The Posse’s alliance with McMahon faded away after a failed attempt to help Shane beat Test at SummerSlam, and they became regular jobber fodder on Sunday Night Heat. Gas managed to eek-out brief Hardcore Title win during this time, and their most notable program came in 2000, when Edge & Christian hired them to steal the Hardy Boyz’ tag team championships.

For whatever reason, WWE decided to promote Abs as Stephanie McMahon’s former lover shortly after, but they never gained any traction. They were eventually released from their contracts in 2001, and it was probably for the best...

2: Kaientai - Many fans only remember Kaientai as Taka Michinoku and Funaki: a lower-midcard tag team best known for their dubbed voiceover promos and inability to actually win matches, but their history stretches back to 1994.

Formed by Dick Togo in Japan’s Michinoku Pro promotion, the group originally included Togo, Mens Teioh, and WCW’s Kaz Hayashi. They were later joined by Taka and Funaki, and found their way to WWE as a stable in 1998. Michinoku had already signed with WWE, and the remaining members showed-up on an episode of Raw to beat him down.

Their most infamous moment came shortly after. Val Venis’ pornstar gimmick was in full-flow at the time, and the group’s manager, Yamagushi-San, was enraged when a pornographic image of Venis and his wife started circulating. Thus brought about the “choppy choppy your pee pee!” incident, which saw Taka turn on Venis to join Kaientai, before Yamagushi-San, ahem, choppy-choppy’d Venis’ pee-pee live on air.

The Attitude Era! Gotta love it, right?

It was later revealed that Venis’ manhood had been spared, and Togo and Teioh left WWE with the Yamaguchis shortly afterwards. Funaki and Taka continued as a tag team before Michinoku decided to return to Japan, leaving Funaki alone to fulfil his destiny as SmackDown’s “number one announcer.”

1: The Union - The shortest-lives stable on the list but also the most star-studded, The Union enjoyed a quick cup of coffee in WWE back in May 1999. Comprised of Ken Shamrock, Test, Mankind, and The Big Show, they were a group of hacked-off wrestlers who’d had enough of the bosses’ shenanigans, and they weren’t gonna take it any more!

They came together through a shared distrust of authority, and all four felt they’d been treated unjustly by the Corporate Ministry. They didn’t stand alone, however: The Rock and Steve Austin regularly stood by their side, as did Vince McMahon, who’d been ousted as the Corporation’s leader in the months prior.

The group of esteemed future Hall-of-Famers (and their dull mate Test) carried 2x4s for the ring, but met their end just a few weeks after forming. Mankind took a sledgehammer blow to the knee during a hardcore match with Triple H, and with his lay-off and Vince McMahon’s reveal as the “Higher Power” whom the Ministry had been taking orders from, the group quietly faded away.

Though the group’s full name was “Union of People You Oughtta Respect, Son” (UPYOURS… how very clever), the “Union” title was a clear job at Vince’s real-life disdain for worker’s unions. Though short-lived, the group played a significant role in shaping wrestling’s future when part-owner Austin granted each member a wish. Bizarrely, Test asked for a date with Stephanie McMahon, leading to the two becoming an item, before their wedding was interrupted by Triple H, who’d married her in a convoluted plot that made as little sense then as it does now.

The McMahon/Helmsley union was born, and the rest is history.

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boschbourne06
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PostSubject: Re: 10 Stables You Probably Dont Remember    Tue Aug 30, 2016 11:44 am

I Remember 7 out of 10 of them X factor, D.O.A, New Brood,Un-Americans, Mean Street Posse, Kaientai And Union

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PostSubject: Re: 10 Stables You Probably Dont Remember    Tue Aug 30, 2016 12:48 pm

I remember all 10!

Also, I thought the x-factor music was quite good
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